Event Title

Panel 1: The Pioneer Decades

Location

Occom Commons, Goldstein Hall, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH

Start Date

8-11-2019 9:45 AM

End Date

8-11-2019 11:45 AM

Presentation Type

Video

Description

Moderator: Silvia Spitta (SPAN, COLT)

Panelists:

Jay Satterfield (RAUNER) & Barry Scherr (RUSS, Provost emeritus) (speaking about Elizabeth Hapgood, Nadezhda Koroton, and Marie Morosoff, RUSS)

Celia Chen ‘78 (BIOL) and Caroline Cook ‘21 (speaking about Hannah Croasdale, BIOL)

Barbara Will (ENGL, Dean) (speaking about Elizabeth Lyding Will, CLAS)

Silvia Spitta is the Robert E. Maxwell 1923 Professor of Arts and Sciences at Dartmouth College. She is in the Spanish and Portuguese Department and the Comparative Literature Program. Her areas of interest include material and visual culture, contemporary Latin American literature and culture; and US Latino/a writings and border culture. She is the author of Between Two Waters: Narratives of Transculturation in Latin America (Rice UP 1995; Texas A&M 2006), the award winning Misplaced Objects: Collections and Recollections in Europe and America (Texas UP, 2009), and co-editor with Boris Muñoz, of Más allá de la ciudad letrada: Crónicas y espacios urbanos, and with Lois Zamora, a special issue of Comparative Literature, “The Americas Otherwise.” She is currently helping preserve Andean photography archives and she curated a city-wide exhibition of the photographs of indigenous photographer Martin Chambi in the city of Cuzco in 2014 and most recently one in Ayacucho on the works of Baldomero Alejos. She is writing the e-book Out of the Archive and Into the Streets for the Hemispheric Institute of Performance Studies press.

She arrived at Dartmouth in 1989 as an Assistant Professor in Spanish and Portuguese. That year she was the only woman hired. From the beginning of her career here, she was involved with the WGSS program and chaired it from 1992-2002 and she also worked mentoring La Alianza Latina students and the César Chávez dissertation fellows.

Jay Satterfield is the head of Dartmouth College’s Rauner Special Collections Library. Since arriving at Dartmouth in 2004, he has worked to integrate Special Collections into the intellectual life of the College through intensive curricular use of the collections. He is an advocate for hands on learning and creating meaningful connections between the past and the present with rare and unique materials.

He is the author of “The World’s Best Books”: Taste, Culture and the Modern Library (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2002), and he holds a PhD in American Studies from the University of Iowa. Before coming to Dartmouth, he was the Head of Reader Services at the Special Collections Research Center at the University of Chicago Library.

Barry Scherr is the Mandel Family Professor of Russian and Provost Emeritus at Dartmouth, where he was on the faculty from 1974 until 2013. Prior to serving as Provost, he was Associate Dean for the Humanities, and before that he chaired the Russian Department for a total of ten years. He also helped to establish the Program in Jewish Studies and the program in Linguistics and Cognitive Science. His teaching interests have included nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian literature, comparative literature, and film. He has published articles on a wide range of topics in Russian poetry and prose, with special interests in literary figures of the early twentieth century, Russian verse theory, and the poetry of Joseph Brodsky. His books include: Russian Poetry: Meter, Rhythm, and Rhyme; Maksim Gorky: Selected Letters, which he co-edited and co-translated with Andrew Barratt; and, as co-editor with Al LaValley, Eisenstein at 100: A Reconsideration, a collection of articles that is based on a conference held at Dartmouth to mark the centennial of Eisenstein’s birth.

Celia Chen is a Research Professor of Biology at Dartmouth College and the Director of the Dartmouth Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program. Over the last 24 years, her research has focused on the bioaccumulation and fate of metals, and mercury, in particular, in aquatic ecosystems including lakes, streams, and estuaries. She has worked to translate and communicate her science to environmental managers and policy-makers at the local, regional, national, and international levels. She has also served on US Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board Panels and has received research grants from numerous federal agencies including the US Environmental Protection Agency, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. She received her BA in Biology and Environmental Studies in 1978 from Dartmouth, her Masters in Biological Oceanography from the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island in 1986, and her Ph.D. in Aquatic Ecology from Dartmouth in 1994. At Dartmouth, she teaches marine biology and coral reef ecology. She has been mentored by two amazing Dartmouth female faculty members, Dr. Hannah Croasdale and Dr. Carol Folt.

Caroline Cook is a member of the class of 2021 and is majoring in English with a concentration in creative writing and is minoring Art History. She was Rauner Library's first Historical Accountability Fellow, which is how she got involved in this research.

Barbara Will is the A. and R. Newbury Professor of English and the Associate Dean for the Faculty of the Arts and Humanities at Dartmouth College. She received her undergraduate degree in English from Yale University (1985), a Master's degree from Bryn Mawr College (1987), and a Ph.D. in Literature from Duke University (1993), where she did her dissertation with Fredric Jameson on the work of Gertrude Stein. She has been A. and R. Newbury Chair of English since 2011. Professor Will is the author or editor of three books: Race Matters in the 21st Century (under review); Unlikely Collaboration: Gertrude Stein, Bernard Faÿ, and the Vichy Dilemma (2011); and Gertrude Stein, Modernism, and the Problem of “Genius” (2000), as well as many articles on modernism, literature, and culture. She has won prestigious fellowships and awards for her scholarship, including a Frederick Burkhardt award from the American Council of Learned Societies, a Camargo Foundation residency, a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship, a National Humanities Center residency, and the John Huntington Manley Award (twice) from Dartmouth College. In 2015 she chaired a College-wide committee examining the issue of extreme student behavior on the Dartmouth campus which led to the largest overall of undergraduate life in several generations.

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Nov 8th, 9:45 AM Nov 8th, 11:45 AM

Panel 1: The Pioneer Decades

Occom Commons, Goldstein Hall, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH

Moderator: Silvia Spitta (SPAN, COLT)

Panelists:

Jay Satterfield (RAUNER) & Barry Scherr (RUSS, Provost emeritus) (speaking about Elizabeth Hapgood, Nadezhda Koroton, and Marie Morosoff, RUSS)

Celia Chen ‘78 (BIOL) and Caroline Cook ‘21 (speaking about Hannah Croasdale, BIOL)

Barbara Will (ENGL, Dean) (speaking about Elizabeth Lyding Will, CLAS)

Silvia Spitta is the Robert E. Maxwell 1923 Professor of Arts and Sciences at Dartmouth College. She is in the Spanish and Portuguese Department and the Comparative Literature Program. Her areas of interest include material and visual culture, contemporary Latin American literature and culture; and US Latino/a writings and border culture. She is the author of Between Two Waters: Narratives of Transculturation in Latin America (Rice UP 1995; Texas A&M 2006), the award winning Misplaced Objects: Collections and Recollections in Europe and America (Texas UP, 2009), and co-editor with Boris Muñoz, of Más allá de la ciudad letrada: Crónicas y espacios urbanos, and with Lois Zamora, a special issue of Comparative Literature, “The Americas Otherwise.” She is currently helping preserve Andean photography archives and she curated a city-wide exhibition of the photographs of indigenous photographer Martin Chambi in the city of Cuzco in 2014 and most recently one in Ayacucho on the works of Baldomero Alejos. She is writing the e-book Out of the Archive and Into the Streets for the Hemispheric Institute of Performance Studies press.

She arrived at Dartmouth in 1989 as an Assistant Professor in Spanish and Portuguese. That year she was the only woman hired. From the beginning of her career here, she was involved with the WGSS program and chaired it from 1992-2002 and she also worked mentoring La Alianza Latina students and the César Chávez dissertation fellows.

Jay Satterfield is the head of Dartmouth College’s Rauner Special Collections Library. Since arriving at Dartmouth in 2004, he has worked to integrate Special Collections into the intellectual life of the College through intensive curricular use of the collections. He is an advocate for hands on learning and creating meaningful connections between the past and the present with rare and unique materials.

He is the author of “The World’s Best Books”: Taste, Culture and the Modern Library (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2002), and he holds a PhD in American Studies from the University of Iowa. Before coming to Dartmouth, he was the Head of Reader Services at the Special Collections Research Center at the University of Chicago Library.

Barry Scherr is the Mandel Family Professor of Russian and Provost Emeritus at Dartmouth, where he was on the faculty from 1974 until 2013. Prior to serving as Provost, he was Associate Dean for the Humanities, and before that he chaired the Russian Department for a total of ten years. He also helped to establish the Program in Jewish Studies and the program in Linguistics and Cognitive Science. His teaching interests have included nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian literature, comparative literature, and film. He has published articles on a wide range of topics in Russian poetry and prose, with special interests in literary figures of the early twentieth century, Russian verse theory, and the poetry of Joseph Brodsky. His books include: Russian Poetry: Meter, Rhythm, and Rhyme; Maksim Gorky: Selected Letters, which he co-edited and co-translated with Andrew Barratt; and, as co-editor with Al LaValley, Eisenstein at 100: A Reconsideration, a collection of articles that is based on a conference held at Dartmouth to mark the centennial of Eisenstein’s birth.

Celia Chen is a Research Professor of Biology at Dartmouth College and the Director of the Dartmouth Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program. Over the last 24 years, her research has focused on the bioaccumulation and fate of metals, and mercury, in particular, in aquatic ecosystems including lakes, streams, and estuaries. She has worked to translate and communicate her science to environmental managers and policy-makers at the local, regional, national, and international levels. She has also served on US Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board Panels and has received research grants from numerous federal agencies including the US Environmental Protection Agency, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. She received her BA in Biology and Environmental Studies in 1978 from Dartmouth, her Masters in Biological Oceanography from the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island in 1986, and her Ph.D. in Aquatic Ecology from Dartmouth in 1994. At Dartmouth, she teaches marine biology and coral reef ecology. She has been mentored by two amazing Dartmouth female faculty members, Dr. Hannah Croasdale and Dr. Carol Folt.

Caroline Cook is a member of the class of 2021 and is majoring in English with a concentration in creative writing and is minoring Art History. She was Rauner Library's first Historical Accountability Fellow, which is how she got involved in this research.

Barbara Will is the A. and R. Newbury Professor of English and the Associate Dean for the Faculty of the Arts and Humanities at Dartmouth College. She received her undergraduate degree in English from Yale University (1985), a Master's degree from Bryn Mawr College (1987), and a Ph.D. in Literature from Duke University (1993), where she did her dissertation with Fredric Jameson on the work of Gertrude Stein. She has been A. and R. Newbury Chair of English since 2011. Professor Will is the author or editor of three books: Race Matters in the 21st Century (under review); Unlikely Collaboration: Gertrude Stein, Bernard Faÿ, and the Vichy Dilemma (2011); and Gertrude Stein, Modernism, and the Problem of “Genius” (2000), as well as many articles on modernism, literature, and culture. She has won prestigious fellowships and awards for her scholarship, including a Frederick Burkhardt award from the American Council of Learned Societies, a Camargo Foundation residency, a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship, a National Humanities Center residency, and the John Huntington Manley Award (twice) from Dartmouth College. In 2015 she chaired a College-wide committee examining the issue of extreme student behavior on the Dartmouth campus which led to the largest overall of undergraduate life in several generations.