Event Title

Panel 3: Contemporary Faculty Experiences

Location

Occom Commons, Goldstein Hall, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH

Start Date

8-11-2019 2:00 PM

End Date

8-11-2019 3:30 PM

Presentation Type

Video

Description

Moderator: Bethany Moreton (HIST)

Panelists:

Zaneta Thayer (ANTH)

Yui Hashimoto (Society of Fellows)

Mary Lou Guerinot (BIOL)

Desiree Garcia (FILM)

Bethany Moreton (Ph.D., Yale ‘06) is Professor of History and a faculty fellow in the Consortium for Studies in Race, Migration, and Sexuality at Dartmouth, and the 2020 Heilbroner Fellow in Capitalism Studies at the New School for Social Research in New York. She co-edits the Columbia University Press book series Studies in the History of U.S. Capitalism. Her work includes Fifty Shades of Green: Erotics and Economics in the Culture Wars (MIT Press, forthcoming 2020); To Serve God and Wal-Mart: The Making of Christian Free Enterprise (Harvard, 2009), which won the OAH’s Frederick Jackson Turner Award and the ASA’s John Hope Franklin Prize; and Devotions and Desires: Histories of Religion and Sexuality in the Twentieth-Century United States, (UNC, 2017) co-edited with Gill Frank and Heather White, as well as articles and book chapters on the conservative intersections of religion, sex, and economics. She is currently at work on Slouching Towards Moscow: American Conservatives and the Romance of Russia (Harvard University Press). When the U.S. state of Georgia banned undocumented immigrants from its public universities in 2010, she co-founded Freedom University to provide free university-level coursework to Georgia high-school graduates regardless of immigration status. She is a founding member of the Tepoztlán Institute for the Transnational History of the Americas, now in its sixteenth year of annual trilingual seminars in Mexico.

Zane Thayer is Dartmouth '08 and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology. Her work investigates how stress exposures, particularly in early life, shape patterns of human biology and health. Much of her research has explored the health impacts of exposures such as poverty, discrimination, acculturative stress, and historical trauma in New Zealand and among Native American communities in the United States.

Yui Hashimoto is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Society of Fellows and the Department of Geography at Dartmouth College. She received her PhD in 2018 in Geography from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She is a feminist economic geographer whose work focuses on urban economic change, social difference, and social movements to examine how racial capitalism, as a global and historical system, is reproduced and contested through local urban development. Her current research and publication projects examine economic redevelopment, colorblindness, and segregation in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In addition, she is working on an oral history of Japanese American internees who relocated to Milwaukee after the Second World War. Her second project will examine Asian Diasporic anti-Blackness and anti-racisms in New York City.

Mary Lou Guerinot is the Ronald and Deborah Harris Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Dartmouth College. She earned her bachelor’s degree in biology at Cornell University and her Ph.D. in biology from Dalhousie University, followed by postdoctoral studies at the University of Maryland and at the DOE–MSU Plant Research Laboratory. At Dartmouth, where she rose through the ranks to full professor, she has served as chair of the Department of Biological Sciences, as Associate Dean of the Faculty for the Sciences and as Vice Provost. She has also served as a member of the Advisory Committee for Biological Sciences at the National Science Foundation, is a Past President and past Chair of the Board of Trustees of the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB) and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and ASPB. She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2016. She currently serves as Chair of the Scientific Advisory Board for the Boyce Thompson Institute and is on the Board of Directors for the Genetics Society of America. She is a recipient of the Dartmouth Graduate Mentoring Award, the Dean of Faculty Award for Outstanding Mentoring and Advising and the Dennis R. Hoagland Award and Stephen Hales Prize from ASPB.

Dr. Guerinot pioneered research on metal metabolism in plants through key discoveries of genes involved in major transport processes for minerals such as iron and zinc. Her research is critically important for both agriculture and human nutrition since iron and zinc deficiencies affect billions of humans that rely upon crop-based diets.

Desirée J. Garcia is Associate Professor in the Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies Program and an affiliate in the Film and Media Studies Department at Dartmouth College. She is the author of The Migration of Musical Film: From Ethnic Margins to American Mainstream (Rutgers, 2014). She has also published numerous articles on the transnational histories of musical film, ethnic performance, and spectatorship in the Quarterly Review of Film and Video, Film History, the Journal of American Ethnic History, and Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies. Her forthcoming book is under contract with Rutgers University Press and is entitled, The Dressing Room: Backstage Stories and American Film. She has a PhD in American Studies from Boston University and BA in History from Wellesley College, where she was a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow. Garcia has also worked as an Associate Producer for American Experience/PBS and starred in the first feature film by director Damien Chazelle (La La Land), an original musical film called Guy and Madeline on a Park Bench (2009).

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Nov 8th, 2:00 PM Nov 8th, 3:30 PM

Panel 3: Contemporary Faculty Experiences

Occom Commons, Goldstein Hall, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH

Moderator: Bethany Moreton (HIST)

Panelists:

Zaneta Thayer (ANTH)

Yui Hashimoto (Society of Fellows)

Mary Lou Guerinot (BIOL)

Desiree Garcia (FILM)

Bethany Moreton (Ph.D., Yale ‘06) is Professor of History and a faculty fellow in the Consortium for Studies in Race, Migration, and Sexuality at Dartmouth, and the 2020 Heilbroner Fellow in Capitalism Studies at the New School for Social Research in New York. She co-edits the Columbia University Press book series Studies in the History of U.S. Capitalism. Her work includes Fifty Shades of Green: Erotics and Economics in the Culture Wars (MIT Press, forthcoming 2020); To Serve God and Wal-Mart: The Making of Christian Free Enterprise (Harvard, 2009), which won the OAH’s Frederick Jackson Turner Award and the ASA’s John Hope Franklin Prize; and Devotions and Desires: Histories of Religion and Sexuality in the Twentieth-Century United States, (UNC, 2017) co-edited with Gill Frank and Heather White, as well as articles and book chapters on the conservative intersections of religion, sex, and economics. She is currently at work on Slouching Towards Moscow: American Conservatives and the Romance of Russia (Harvard University Press). When the U.S. state of Georgia banned undocumented immigrants from its public universities in 2010, she co-founded Freedom University to provide free university-level coursework to Georgia high-school graduates regardless of immigration status. She is a founding member of the Tepoztlán Institute for the Transnational History of the Americas, now in its sixteenth year of annual trilingual seminars in Mexico.

Zane Thayer is Dartmouth '08 and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology. Her work investigates how stress exposures, particularly in early life, shape patterns of human biology and health. Much of her research has explored the health impacts of exposures such as poverty, discrimination, acculturative stress, and historical trauma in New Zealand and among Native American communities in the United States.

Yui Hashimoto is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Society of Fellows and the Department of Geography at Dartmouth College. She received her PhD in 2018 in Geography from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She is a feminist economic geographer whose work focuses on urban economic change, social difference, and social movements to examine how racial capitalism, as a global and historical system, is reproduced and contested through local urban development. Her current research and publication projects examine economic redevelopment, colorblindness, and segregation in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In addition, she is working on an oral history of Japanese American internees who relocated to Milwaukee after the Second World War. Her second project will examine Asian Diasporic anti-Blackness and anti-racisms in New York City.

Mary Lou Guerinot is the Ronald and Deborah Harris Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Dartmouth College. She earned her bachelor’s degree in biology at Cornell University and her Ph.D. in biology from Dalhousie University, followed by postdoctoral studies at the University of Maryland and at the DOE–MSU Plant Research Laboratory. At Dartmouth, where she rose through the ranks to full professor, she has served as chair of the Department of Biological Sciences, as Associate Dean of the Faculty for the Sciences and as Vice Provost. She has also served as a member of the Advisory Committee for Biological Sciences at the National Science Foundation, is a Past President and past Chair of the Board of Trustees of the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB) and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and ASPB. She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2016. She currently serves as Chair of the Scientific Advisory Board for the Boyce Thompson Institute and is on the Board of Directors for the Genetics Society of America. She is a recipient of the Dartmouth Graduate Mentoring Award, the Dean of Faculty Award for Outstanding Mentoring and Advising and the Dennis R. Hoagland Award and Stephen Hales Prize from ASPB.

Dr. Guerinot pioneered research on metal metabolism in plants through key discoveries of genes involved in major transport processes for minerals such as iron and zinc. Her research is critically important for both agriculture and human nutrition since iron and zinc deficiencies affect billions of humans that rely upon crop-based diets.

Desirée J. Garcia is Associate Professor in the Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies Program and an affiliate in the Film and Media Studies Department at Dartmouth College. She is the author of The Migration of Musical Film: From Ethnic Margins to American Mainstream (Rutgers, 2014). She has also published numerous articles on the transnational histories of musical film, ethnic performance, and spectatorship in the Quarterly Review of Film and Video, Film History, the Journal of American Ethnic History, and Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies. Her forthcoming book is under contract with Rutgers University Press and is entitled, The Dressing Room: Backstage Stories and American Film. She has a PhD in American Studies from Boston University and BA in History from Wellesley College, where she was a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow. Garcia has also worked as an Associate Producer for American Experience/PBS and starred in the first feature film by director Damien Chazelle (La La Land), an original musical film called Guy and Madeline on a Park Bench (2009).