Event Title

Conference Welcome

Location

Occom Commons, Goldstein Hall, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH

Start Date

8-11-2019 9:30 AM

End Date

8-11-2019 9:45 AM

Presentation Type

Video

Description

Sienna Craig (ANTH) introduces Elizabeth Smith, Dean of the Faculty

Sienna R. Craig is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Dartmouth College (USA). She received her BA from Brown in University (Religious Studies, 1995) and her PhD from Cornell University (Anthropology, 2006). Craig is the author of Healing Elements: Efficacy and the Social Ecologies of Tibetan Medicine (UC Press, 2012), Horses Like Lightning: A Story of Passage through the Himalaya (Wisdom Publications, 2008), and the co-editor of Medicine Between Science and Religion: Explorations on Tibetan Grounds (Berghahn Books, 2010), and Studies of Medical Pluralism in Tibetan History and Society (IITBS, 2010). Her scholarship has appeared in Current Anthropology, Cultural Anthropology, Medical Anthropology Quarterly, Anthropology and Humanism, Journal of the American Medical Association, Hastings Review, and Social Science and Medicine, among other peer reviewed journals. Her research has been supported by grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, the Fulbright Commission, and the Social Science Research Council, among other sources. She has worked on collaborative, applied global health projects funded by the Gates Foundation, the World Health Organization, the National Institutes of Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Craig enjoys writing across genres, from literary ethnography and interdisciplinary social science to creative nonfiction, fiction, children’s literature, and poetry. Craig’s forthcoming book, The Ends of Kinship: Himalayan Lives Between Nepal and New York City (forthcoming from University of Washington Press, 2020) uses fiction and ethnography to tell stories of migration and social change. From 2012-2017 Craig was the co-editor of HIMALAYA, flagship peer-reviewed Journal of the Association for Nepal and Himalayan Studies. Since 2009, she has served as a member of the Executive Council of the International Association for the Study of Traditional Asian Medicine (IASTAM) Council. Craig is also a co-founder of DROKPA, a nonprofit organization that partners with Himalayan communities to support projects in education, community health, and social entrepreneurship.

Elizabeth F. Smith. In June of 2017, Elizabeth F. Smith, the Paul M. Dauten Jr. Professor of Biological Sciences, was named the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Smith will serve a five-year term overseeing 41 departments and programs comprised of about 600 faculty members. Prior to her appointment, Smith was the Associate Dean of the Faculty for the Sciences, and before that served as the Chair of the Department of Biological Sciences.

A scientist whose research focuses on the assembly and motility of cilia and flagella — structures on the surface of cells — Smith has trained scores of undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows in her laboratory. Her work, which is critical for human health and development, has received funding by the National Institutes of Health since her arrival at Dartmouth in 1998.

In addition to her research and teaching, Smith has an active interest in exploring connections between art and science. As biological sciences chair, she partnered with the Hood Museum of Art to commission a sculpture by artist and alumnus Gar Waterman ’78 for the Class of 1978 Life Sciences Center. With support from the Andrew W. Mellon foundation, Smith worked with the Hopkins Center for the Arts to connect science faculty with emerging composer Fay Wang on a music interpretation of microbiology.

In her professional service, Smith has served as chair of a Gordon Research Conference, an international forum for the presentation and discussion of frontier research in biological, chemical, and physical sciences. She is currently serving on a National Institutes of Health Study Section, a panel that performs peer reviews of grant applications. In 2014, she received the Dauten endowed professorship at Dartmouth. A year earlier, she was inducted into Dartmouth’s Phi Beta Kappa Society chapter as an honorary member. She has received a number of external honors and fellowships, including being chosen as a K.R. Porter Fellow by the Porter Endowment for Cell Biology in 2008. The endowment, named for the researcher considered to have established the field of cell biology, honors mid-career scientists who have the potential for an outstanding career in cell biology.

Smith received her bachelor’s degree in biology with honors from Agnes Scott College and her PhD in cell and developmental biology from Emory University. Before coming to Dartmouth, Smith spent six years at the University of Minnesota, where she received a prestigious American Cancer Society fellowship for her post-doctoral work in genetics and cell biology.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 8th, 9:30 AM Nov 8th, 9:45 AM

Conference Welcome

Occom Commons, Goldstein Hall, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH

Sienna Craig (ANTH) introduces Elizabeth Smith, Dean of the Faculty

Sienna R. Craig is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Dartmouth College (USA). She received her BA from Brown in University (Religious Studies, 1995) and her PhD from Cornell University (Anthropology, 2006). Craig is the author of Healing Elements: Efficacy and the Social Ecologies of Tibetan Medicine (UC Press, 2012), Horses Like Lightning: A Story of Passage through the Himalaya (Wisdom Publications, 2008), and the co-editor of Medicine Between Science and Religion: Explorations on Tibetan Grounds (Berghahn Books, 2010), and Studies of Medical Pluralism in Tibetan History and Society (IITBS, 2010). Her scholarship has appeared in Current Anthropology, Cultural Anthropology, Medical Anthropology Quarterly, Anthropology and Humanism, Journal of the American Medical Association, Hastings Review, and Social Science and Medicine, among other peer reviewed journals. Her research has been supported by grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, the Fulbright Commission, and the Social Science Research Council, among other sources. She has worked on collaborative, applied global health projects funded by the Gates Foundation, the World Health Organization, the National Institutes of Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Craig enjoys writing across genres, from literary ethnography and interdisciplinary social science to creative nonfiction, fiction, children’s literature, and poetry. Craig’s forthcoming book, The Ends of Kinship: Himalayan Lives Between Nepal and New York City (forthcoming from University of Washington Press, 2020) uses fiction and ethnography to tell stories of migration and social change. From 2012-2017 Craig was the co-editor of HIMALAYA, flagship peer-reviewed Journal of the Association for Nepal and Himalayan Studies. Since 2009, she has served as a member of the Executive Council of the International Association for the Study of Traditional Asian Medicine (IASTAM) Council. Craig is also a co-founder of DROKPA, a nonprofit organization that partners with Himalayan communities to support projects in education, community health, and social entrepreneurship.

Elizabeth F. Smith. In June of 2017, Elizabeth F. Smith, the Paul M. Dauten Jr. Professor of Biological Sciences, was named the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Smith will serve a five-year term overseeing 41 departments and programs comprised of about 600 faculty members. Prior to her appointment, Smith was the Associate Dean of the Faculty for the Sciences, and before that served as the Chair of the Department of Biological Sciences.

A scientist whose research focuses on the assembly and motility of cilia and flagella — structures on the surface of cells — Smith has trained scores of undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows in her laboratory. Her work, which is critical for human health and development, has received funding by the National Institutes of Health since her arrival at Dartmouth in 1998.

In addition to her research and teaching, Smith has an active interest in exploring connections between art and science. As biological sciences chair, she partnered with the Hood Museum of Art to commission a sculpture by artist and alumnus Gar Waterman ’78 for the Class of 1978 Life Sciences Center. With support from the Andrew W. Mellon foundation, Smith worked with the Hopkins Center for the Arts to connect science faculty with emerging composer Fay Wang on a music interpretation of microbiology.

In her professional service, Smith has served as chair of a Gordon Research Conference, an international forum for the presentation and discussion of frontier research in biological, chemical, and physical sciences. She is currently serving on a National Institutes of Health Study Section, a panel that performs peer reviews of grant applications. In 2014, she received the Dauten endowed professorship at Dartmouth. A year earlier, she was inducted into Dartmouth’s Phi Beta Kappa Society chapter as an honorary member. She has received a number of external honors and fellowships, including being chosen as a K.R. Porter Fellow by the Porter Endowment for Cell Biology in 2008. The endowment, named for the researcher considered to have established the field of cell biology, honors mid-career scientists who have the potential for an outstanding career in cell biology.

Smith received her bachelor’s degree in biology with honors from Agnes Scott College and her PhD in cell and developmental biology from Emory University. Before coming to Dartmouth, Smith spent six years at the University of Minnesota, where she received a prestigious American Cancer Society fellowship for her post-doctoral work in genetics and cell biology.